Category Archives: Juveniles

HMYOI Parc Juvenile Unit – Much good work with children, but some safety concern

parc

There was much to commend at Parc, but they needed to understand why safety had declined and act upon it, said Peter Clarke, Chief Inspector of Prisons. Today he published the report of an announced inspection of the young people’s unit at the local prison in South Wales. [previous report]

Parc juvenile unit is a distinct and generally well separated part of the much larger prison, HMP/YOI Parc near Bridgend. The unit can accommodate 64 children, though 38 were there at the time of inspection. Its catchment area encompasses south and mid-Wales and much of south-west England. When it was last inspected in May 2014, inspectors found that young people were well cared for and experienced positive outcomes. During this more recent inspection, outcomes in the important areas of ‘safety’ and ‘respect’ had declined from ‘good’ to ‘reasonably good’. Reception, safeguarding and child protection arrangements remained effective.

However, inspectors were concerned to find that:

  • 42% of children reported being victimised by staff, which had more than doubled from the 20% in May 2014;
  • only 55% of boys felt they were treated with respect by staff;
  • the use of force had tripled since the previous inspection, mostly in response to violent incidents; and
  • almost a quarter of the boys reported having been assaulted by other boys at Parc.

Some of this level of violence was ascribed by staff to the destabilising effect of two particularly difficult children transferred into Parc during the autumn of 2015. If that was the case, managers need to be sure they have plans in place to stop it happening again.

The leadership were committed to providing a safe and decent environment for children and there were many instances of good work, including:

  • boys accessed significantly more time out of their cell than at other young offender institutions, with regular association and exercise periods; and
  • segregation was rarely used, despite challenging behaviour.

Peter Clarke said:

“Despite all the positive things that were happening at Parc, there can be no room for complacency, as the judgements in the areas of ‘safety’ and ‘respect’ have declined since the last inspection. I am sure the leadership at Parc will give this their full attention, and strive to return the establishment to its previous high performance in these key areas.”

Michael Spurr, Chief Executive of the National Offender Management Service, said:

“As the report notes, there is some very positive work being undertaken with young people in Parc with a high level of purposeful activity and good education and resettlement provision. The number of young people in custody has continued to fall but the challenges presented by those who remain, particularly in terms of violence, are considerable. The Director and her team are committed to providing a safe and positive environment for young people in their care and will use the findings from this report to address areas of concern to achieve improvement.”

A copy of the full report can be found on the HM Inspectorate of Prisons website at: justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmiprisons

HMYOI Werrington – Safety concerns but improvements in education and resettlement

Safety had deteriorated at HMYOI Werrington, but it was positive in other areas, said Martin Lomas, Deputy Chief Inspector of Prisons. Today he published the report of an unannounced inspection of the young offender institution near Stoke-on-Trent. HMYOI Werrington can hold up to 142 boys aged between 15 and 18. At the time of the… Continue Reading

Significant changes in backgrounds and needs of Children in Custody says Chief Inspector in new Thematic Review

The number of children in custody has fallen sharply, but the backgrounds and needs of those who remain have become more complex, said Nick Hardwick, Chief Inspector of Prisons. Today he published a thematic report on the results of surveys of children in custody. The report, Children in Custody 2014-15: an analysis of 12-18-year-olds’ perceptions… Continue Reading

HMYOI Werrington – Improvements made but challenges remain say Inspectors

HMYOI Werrington was working more positively with the young people it held, but still had areas to address, said Nick Hardwick, Chief Inspector of Prisons. Today he published the report of an unannounced inspection of the young offender institution near Stoke-on-Trent. HMYOI Werrington holds up to 160 boys under the age of 18. During the… Continue Reading

INQUEST response to the YJB Child Deaths Report

INQUEST response to Youth Justice Board report on deaths of children in custody Deborah Coles, co-director of INQUEST said: “Whilst this report offers some insight into the Board’s learning from child deaths, it can be no substitute for a wider review. “INQUEST’s work on the deaths of children shows the same issues of concern repeat… Continue Reading

Ashfield – high levels of violence and use of force by staff

Nick Hardwick, the Chief Inspector of Prisons, in a report to be published at midnight, says that in his final inspection of HMYOI Ashfield before it is re-roled from a juvenile institution to a category C adult male prison for sex offenders, he found there were high levels of violence, self-harm, along with high levels… Continue Reading

Hindley Prison: Inspectors found “overwhelming levels of self-harm and violence”

HM Chief Inspector of Prisons, Nick Hardwick, in a report on Hindley Prison published today (25th April) says: HM Young Offender Institution Hindley is a large establishment just outside Wigan with the capacity to hold 440 boys and young people aged 15 to 18. At the time of this inspection it was only just over… Continue Reading

17 YEAR OLDS ‘ARE STILL CHILDREN’ HIGH COURT TOLD

Seventeen-year-olds suspected of crime are wrongly being treated as adults and losing vital protection when they are arrested, the High Court was told today. A teenager backed by several children’s rights campaign groups is seeking a landmark ruling that, at 17, young people should still be treated as children when taken into custody. This would… Continue Reading

36,000 JUVENILE OFFENDERS COMMITTED OVER 100,000 CRIMES WITHIN 12 MONTHS OF RELEASE

More than a third of juvenile offenders went on to commit another offence within a year, figures showed today. But in some parts of England and Wales, this rose to almost half, according to the latest Ministry of Justice (MoJ) figures. Almost 36,000 of the 110,000 young offenders aged under 18 who were cautioned, convicted… Continue Reading

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