Former police officer and care worker gets life for attempted murder.

melissaswiftA former police officer and  care worker, who used eye drops and a bleach-based cleaning fluid to poison colleagues at a residential home, has been given a life sentence.

Melissa Swift was handed a minimum term of eight years after a court heard how she also sent an anonymous bloodstained letter to her step-sister, threatening to kill her before cooking and eating her body.

Swift, formerly of Hambletts Road, West Bromwich, pleaded guilty in February last year to three counts of attempted murder. The 25-year-old former police volunteer further admitted two offences of making threats to kill her step-sister and another woman.

opening the facts of the care worker’s offending in July and August 2014, prosecutor Matthew Brook said Swift had placed noxious substances into water jugs and bottles at West Bromwich’s Goldfield Court care home.

Swift’s actions led to at least three of her colleagues being taken ill – one with a suspected stroke – after they consumed what they thought was normal water.

Mr Brook said: “The offences not only represent a severe breach of trust but also the accepted intention to kill three people.”

During the sentencing of Swift, who appeared in court via a videolink to Rampton psychiatric hospital in Nottinghamshire, it emerged that the poisonings were only uncovered after she confessed to a friend and her GP.

Judge Mark Wall QC was told that Swift has since been treated for a depressive disorder at Rampton.

Ordering that the would-be killer should be cared for at Rampton rather than in a prisonwhile she still requires treatment, Judge Wall told Swift: “You took, from your home to your workplace, containers which had noxious liquids in them.

“Your guilty pleas confirm your desire that people should drink those liquids and die as a result.

“The effects of what you did are unmeasurable. What is known is that at the time you were doing this, seven members of staff and 23 residents became unwell. You are surely responsible for much of that illness.”

The judge ruled that there was evidence of planning before the offences, including internet searches related to poisons. Passing a life sentence coupled with a Mental Health Act order, the judge told the defendant: “I am of the view your mental health issues do not extinguish your culpability.”

A previous hearing was told Swift had been a special constable with West Midlands Police until a month prior to her arrest in August 2014.

Commenting on the case, Detective Chief Inspector Michaela Kerr, from the force’s Public Protection Unit, said: “Melissa deceived her colleagues and hatched a plan to cause ill to those she worked with as a result of some malice, for which we have never truly discovered the cause.

“She not only thought out a way of poisoning her work mates but also followed the plan through and administered bleach to their drinks, leaving them in the usual staff fridge where she knew they would go.

“Today’s sentence reflects the severity of her actions. Thankfully no one was seriously injured as a result of what she did, but the story could so easily have been different.”

Ex Police Officer jailed for fraud

Christopher Hawkins
Christopher Hawkins

A former police officer is starting a two-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to fraud offences totalling £85,000, police said.

Christopher Hawkins, 46, of Dorchester Road in Bury St Edmunds, was sentenced at Ipswich Crown Court after previously pleading guilty to four counts of fraud by false representation, according to Norfolk Constabulary.

Hawkins, a former police officer with Norfolk Constabulary, committed the offences between January 30 2007 and August 31 2013, the force said.

He falsely claimed his former wife had signed and agreed to be bound by the terms of credit agreements including extending mortgages and surrendering endowment policies in order to obtain cash loans.

Police said he made these applications on both their behalves, forging signatures to acquire the money to pay significant gambling debts.

These offences came to light following a previous investigation into a fraud allegation which Hawkins was sentenced for in September 2014, receiving a 12-month community order with 12 months’ supervision and 200 hours’ unpaid work, police said.

The force said Hawkins, who had served as an officer between December 1989 and October 2014, was dismissed from the force following his 2014 conviction after an internal disciplinary process with the Professional Standards Department.

Detective Sergeant Gary Lillie, from Norfolk and Suffolk’s anti-corruption unit, said: “We expect the highest level of personal and professional behaviour from those serving with us.

“This result highlights how important it is for the forces to continue to robustly investigate any allegations of criminal conduct made against its employees or former employees.

“The fact that Hawkins had deceived those who should have been able to trust him the most and who have particularly suffered via his actions is equally unacceptable.”

Sobbing Met cop jailed for 8 months

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Pc Andrew Ott
Pc Andrew Ott

A policeman from Rochester who knocked a man’s tooth out with his riot shield during the 2010 student protests has been jailed for eight months.

Pc Andrew Ott, 36, struck Royal Holloway student William Horner as he tried to break free from a kettled area on Parliament Square, Westminster, London.

Ott was found guilty of one count of assault occasioning actual bodily harm, but cleared of perverting the course of justice.

At London’s Southwark Crown Court, Ott sobbed in the dock as he was sentenced to eight months in prison.

Judge Jeffrey Pegden told Ott he had carried out “gratuitous and unnecessary violence” and abused his power as a police officer.

The judge told Ott: “This offence was committed in a sterile area, in relative darkness, when you had the victim cornered and no violence was necessary at all.

“An extremely serious aggravating factor is your abuse of power as a police officer.

“You hit him with a full force blow to his face with your shield.

“That was wholly gratuitous, unnecessary violence, and I have considered the stress on William Horner over the last few years.”

Ott wiped his eyes with a tissue while in the dock, and a woman in the public gallery broke down in tears after the sentence was passed.

Ott’s colleagues, Pc Calvin Lindsay and Pc Thomas Barnes, were both cleared of perverting the course of justice.

Jurors heard that Ott was taped on his personal recording device threatening violence towards the crowds that had gathered near the Houses of Parliament and talking about “getting” the protesters.

The assault happened after Ott chased Mr Horner as he tried to scale a fence and was captured on the audio device the police officer had on his uniform.

He was heard saying: “Poked the little c*** right in the eye” and “I’ve had enough of these c****, I just f******* hit him,” the court heard.

The violent protests saw riot police pelted with missiles, including rocks and concrete blocks, and statues in Parliament Square were daubed with graffiti.

No further action was taken against Mr Horner, who was 20 at the time of the attack

Judge Pegden said he had “absolutely no doubt” that policing the protests on December 9 2010 was “frightening, stressful and exhausting”.

But Mr Horner, who was not in court for the sentencing, “simply wanted to go home” and had not committed an offence when he was attacked, the judge added.

In mitigation, Kevin Baumber said his client had been diagnosed with depression and suffered from severe stress.

“Your honour may feel think on that day he was pushed into losing his normally sound judgment in what was a long, tiring and terrifying day,” Mr Baumber said. “It was a day that was traumatic. It was a trauma that still lives with him.”

Ott, who has served as a police officer since 2003, faced the “double jeopardy” of criminal proceedings and disciplinary action and was in danger of losing a career “that is dear to him”, he added.

An investigation by the Independent Police Complaints Commission found all three officers have a case to answer for gross misconduct and they will face disciplinary hearings by the Metropolitan Police Service.

Deputy Assistant Commissioner Fiona Taylor, of the Met Police’s directorate of professionalism, said: “We are naturally disappointed that an MPS officer has been convicted of an assault.

“His behaviour clearly fell well below the high standards we expect of our officers, even in challenging circumstances such as the violent disorder in which this incident occurred, and it is right that he was held to account in the criminal courts.

“His case and that of the other two officers involved will now be subject to the misconduct process. Until this is completed it would be inappropriate for us to comment further.”

PC jailed for 3 years for sex on duty

PC Adam Rushton
PC Adam Rushton

A police officer who had oral sex with vulnerable women while on duty has been jailed for three years.

Pc Adam Rushton, branded “a disgrace to the police service” on conviction last month, was sentenced at Birmingham Crown Court today for five counts of misconduct.

The 37-year-old, of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, was also found guilty of breaching data protection laws while a Staffordshire Police officer based in Longton, Stoke-on-Trent.

During his three-week trial, Rushton conceded that some of his actions were “not very professional” but denied that it amounted to criminal conduct.

Judge Murray Creed, sentencing, said: “This case is personal tragedy for you and your family. As a police officer you were in a position of trust with the public.”

The court heard in mitigation that Rushton attempted to resign his post but was sacked by the force, with whom he served for 10 years, on Monday under a fast-tracking procedure.

Judge Creed said Rushton had come across his victims “at a stage when people were in vulnerable periods of their lives”.

He added: “There was distress caused to those victims, some of them, self-evident during their evidence”.

Judge Creed said it was concerning to hear colleagues had tried to warn Rushton over his behaviour, and that on one occasion “you did not tell the truth to senior officers seeking to help you”.

The offending spanned four years, from 2008 to 2012, and involved five women in all.

Judge Creed said the most serious incident involved a very vulnerable victim whom he visited in uniform at her home.

Rushton made up the reason for the visit, accusing her over a “bogus cyber bullying issue”, and convinced her to show him her private parts under the auspices of his fake investigation.

Judge Creed said: “Plainly that must have been humiliating, but the incident didn’t emerge until two years later when she was seen by officers in connection with another matter and referred, in passing, to that.

“As a result, this whole inquiry was commenced. It is a troubling episode as far as she is concerned.

“She was plainly vulnerable – indeed she said she did not think she would be believed because of her history.”

In relation to the other counts, Rushton met what the judge described as another “vulnerable young lady” through a police incident, befriending her and eventually entering into a relationship.

He was convicted of conducting a social visit to her home.

Another woman he met through an internet dating site and he was found guilty of receiving oral sex from her during a work-time break.

He was also convicted of going to her home, while in uniform, with the intention of having some sexual contact.

The judge said: “She believed you wanted to have sex, but in any event it didn’t take place as she found you smelled of garlic.”

There was another encounter with a fourth woman while on duty and in uniform, whereRushton received oral sex, later texting her saying “You’re ace”.

Judge Creed said: “The texts were graphic. Those details were studied and plainly, at the time, you were on duty.

He added: “There were calls to your unit, while you were engaged in the activity or shortly thereafter.”

“Prior to that there were two calls which had been ignored from control.”

He was also convicted of looking up a fifth victim’s details on the police computer system.

During the trial, Rushton was acquitted of five other counts of misconduct in a public office and a single charge of breaching the Data Protection Act.

The former neighbourhood police officer, wearing a grey suit, made no reaction as he was sentenced and seemed prepared for the possibility of custody by bringing a holdall of belongings with him.

Kevin Baumber, in mitigation, described Rushton as “a hard-working conscientious police officer, achieving results, involved in charity work, and a doting father and husband, still in the long process of rehabilitation but someone who has the support of his family”.

He added: “The impact, sadly, will fall most brutally upon his wife and his children and that is something he will have to live with and continue to make amends for.”

Afterwards, Deputy Chief Constable Nick Baker, of Staffordshire Police, welcomed the sentence, saying Rushton had “brought shame” on himself and the force.

“I have apologised personally to those victims of his actions on behalf of Staffordshire Police,” he said.

“I would also like to thank those individuals who supported the investigation and gave evidence during the recent trial; their bravery should not be underestimated.

“Adam Rushton brought shame on himself, his colleagues and Staffordshire Police.

“There is simply no excuse for Rushton’s actions and we will not tolerate such disgraceful behaviour in this organisation.

“The public must be able to trust their police officers, and on this occasion they were badly let down. He has been dismissed from the force.

“I want to reassure the public of Staffordshire lessons have been learned from this matter and we will take robust action against any officer or member of staff whose behaviour falls below the high standards expected.

“We are proud that the overwhelming majority of officers and staff members work hard and with integrity to serve the people of Staffordshire.”

Former top cop jailed for harassment

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A former high ranking and highly decorated police chief has been jailed for 12 months for a campaign of harassment against two women.

Former Detective Chief Superintendant Colin Andrews, 58, showed no emotion as he was led from the dock at Manchester Crown Court.

Andrews, who led a series of high profile investigations for Humberside Police, was found guilty at a trial of aggravated stalking, witness intimidation, common assault and harassment.

The judge, Mrs Justice Patterson, told Andrews: “You thought that not only you were above the law but you could manipulate the course of justice to your own ends.”

She said his actions to try and stop one woman’s attempts to report his behaviour were a deliberate attempt to intimidate her “that was as arrogant as it was ill-judged”.

The judge said Andrews’s behaviour had affected both women’s lives. Referring to one, she said: “The quality of her life has been seriously affected by your bullying and inappropriate conduct.”

Considering the impact on the other woman, the judge said: “She feels she will always be watching over her shoulder and living in fear.”

Andrews, of Brough, East Yorkshire, was found guilty of the offences by a jury in January. But he was cleared of charges of rape, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, and a further charge of common assault.

The assault he was sentenced for today happened when a passer-by, Owen Phillips, tried to intervene in an altercation in the street between Andrews and one of the women, who cannot be named.

The trial heard that Andrews slapped Mr Phillips in the face as he was making a 999 call and called him an “unemployed knob”, despite the fact he was on his way to work.

Mr Phillips, who was praised as a “good Samaritan” by the judge today, managed to make the emergency call and the jury heard the defendant was ranting, calling the woman a “lesbian” and a “slag”.

The jury heard Andrews’s behaviour towards the first woman spanned a year between August 2012 and August 2013 and included bombarding her with hundreds of text messages.

The judge said: “No one could doubt the serious impact of your behaviour on her.”

She told Andrews his behaviour had nearly driven the woman to a breakdown as he refused her pleas to leave her alone, requests repeated by friends and colleagues.

The judge said Andrews also bombarded the other woman with unwanted messages – including 37 calls in one day and 111 text messages. She rejected Andrews’s claims that he was “smothering her with attention”.

Andrews stood in the dock to listen to the judge’s final remarks dressed in a light grey suit, white shirt and grey tie.

The judge told him he had made a success of his life after a very difficult start, being brought up in an orphanage.

She said that after his retirement as a high ranking police officer he had secured a high-level civilian role with Humberside Police as a crime and justice manager.

The judge said: “At the moment of your life you should have been enjoying the fruits of your endeavours, all of these endeavours you, and you alone, have thrown away.”

Andrews was in charge of a number of high profile investigations for Humberside Police in a 36-year career, including the inquiry into the mysterious death of Army cadet Stephen Hilder in a parachuting incident in 2003.

He also led the long-running investigation into the murder of Keith Slater who was stabbed to death in Hessle, near Hull, in 1988.

Mitigating today, Tania Griffiths QC, defending, said: “This man has saved many lives. Not everyone can say that. He’s put his own life on the line in order to do that.”

Ms Griffiths said he was once commended for tackling an armed gunman.

“He didn’t need to do that,” the barrister said. “Why did he do it? Because he’s a brave man.”

Ms Griffiths said her client had saved lives on the Humber Bridge due to his negotiating skills.

But many women watching from the public gallery shook their heads when the barrister told the judge: “There’s givers and there’s takers in life and Mr Andrews is a giver.”

Ms Griffiths asked the judge to spare Mr Andrews jail saying there was “just no way” he would ever be before a court again in his life.

She said prison would “break him”, especially due to his police background.

Earlier, prosecutor Owen Edwards said Andrews used his high police office to intimidate the women.

Mr Edwards said Andrews “used that position to add to the distress and concern caused to both complainants by the acts of harassment and stalking.

“In both cases he was to imply and, indeed, expressly say that they would never be believed, that he had the power to prevent an effective investigation taking place and that he had knowledge that would allow him to ensure that should any complaints be made they would never be believed. ”

The prosecutor summarised impact statements from both women.

One said she had been left “emotional and tearful, particularly at work, and unable to deal with conflict”.

She said she “struggled to understand how Mr Andrews could have behaved in the way he did and continue to hold such a senior position within the police force and thereafter, and not show signs at work.”

Mr Edwards said the woman felt Andrews really did have the power he suggested he did to the extent that she wrongly believed her home was bugged.

The other woman said she believed Andrews was “motivated by a need to control and to bully” – “effectively having his way, no matter what.”

The judge imposed five year restraining orders on Andrews in respect of each of the women. But she rejected an application from Mr Edwards that the defendant should pay the £122,000 cost of the prosecution.

Andrews’s solicitor Damian Kelly issued a statement after the hearing which said: “Mr Andrews accepts the verdicts of the jury.”

It stressed the not guilty verdicts brought in by the jury and added: “In relation to the other allegations which he has been found guilty, he wishes to place on record his sincere apology to those complainants affected.

“Mr Andrews now realises, in hindsight, that his actions were inappropriate and misguided. He regrets that, despite his previously unblemished police career, he made wrong decisions.”

The former detective criticised what he said was a £1 million investigation into the rape allegation, of which he was acquitted.

Sex cop jailed

Ian-Langford

A police officer who served with West Mercia Police and who seduced and slept with vulnerable women while on duty has been jailed for 18 months.

Ian Langford, 46, struck up relationships with two women after being called to attend incidents at their homes.

Gloucester Crown Court heard married Langford would visit the women – who he was having relationships with at the same time – during his shifts.

The father-of-one’s police radio was heard to go off during visits and he even called a police car to bring him back to the station, the court was told.

Langford’s “totally unacceptable” actions led to a trial collapsing in court – as he was sleeping with the key prosecution witness.

He also illegally accessed police records to gain the contact details of one of his victims when she changed her phone number after their relationship ended.

Langford, of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, admitted two charges of misconduct in a public office for the relationships, which took place in 2012 and 2013.

In 2008, Langford was docked 13 days pay by West Mercia Police for sleeping with a vulnerable women after attending her home following a domestic violence incident.

Judge Jamie Tabor QC told Langford, who was supported in court by his new wife, that his actions had brought the police service into disrepute.

“You are not a man of good character because in 2008 you were reprimanded for committing a similar, if not identical, offence with another vulnerable woman,” the judge said.

“If you needed reminding that such behaviour was totally unacceptable, that incident should have deterred you.

“However, in May 2012, you met up with one victim. She was the victim of domestic violence, as had been the victim in 2008.

“She was looking for the protection of the law and the understanding of the police. You chose to seduce her when she was at her most vulnerable.

“Later, when the affair had come to an end you misused police data to discover her private phone number.”

The judge said Langford met with a second victim in June 2012, when in a relationship with the first woman, following a neighbourly dispute at her home, which resulted in a trial.

“The case was compromised when it came to trial because the defendant let it be known that you were having an affair with the prosecution witness,” the judge said.

“As a result, the case had to be dropped, although a restraining order was imposed. Nothing could demonstrate better why police officers have to conduct themselves in a exemplary manner.

“Both your victims feel extremely let down by the police. You targeted women when they were at their most vulnerable. You carried out the affairs while actually on duty.

“Your behaviour has brought the police service into disrepute.”

The judge sentenced Langford to nine months for each count of misconduct in a public office, to run consecutively – meaning a prison term of 18 months.

The judge also made an order banning the identification of any of Langford’s victims.

Two Corrupt West Midlands Cops Jailed

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Two corrupt police officers caught in an internal sting operation stealing cash and cigarettes have been jailed for 20 weeks.

Mark Davis, 31, and 33-year-old Neil Samuels, had each previously admitted a single count of theft of hundreds of Marlboro cigarettes and £10 cash apiece before appearing for sentencing at Birmingham Magistrates’ Court today.

Jailing the pair, District Judge David Robinson said their crime was “a gross breach of trust” adding the “impact of such offending on public confidence is high”.

The two serving police officers were caught stealing after they were the focus of a targeted integrity check by their employer West Midlands Police’s counter corruption unit, which was acting on a tip-off.

Both Davis and Samuels had previously pleaded guilty in February to theft of 400 cigarettes with each haul worth a total of £179.80, after they carried out what they believed to be a bona fide house search in July 2013.

Davis, of Clent Road in Oldbury, West Midlands, who has been with the police force six years, and Samuels, of Croft Lane, Wolverhampton, who has been employed for 11 years, have been suspended since the allegations surfaced and are now set to lose their jobs following a professional standards process.

Defence barrister Mark Kelly, offering mitigation for the pair, said Samuels had taken the cash to buy a “peace-offering” for his wife as their relationship had been under strain.

He added Davis had been coping with “a mild-to-severe” depressive illness, added to by “difficulties with his ex-partner which has had a significant impact on him”.

Both men, added Mr Kelly, were simply going to share the cigarettes out “with friends” and had not stolen for financial gain.

He also said any jail term would have a big impact of the men, who both had young families to support.

The operation to snare the two, both employed as response officers covering Sandwell in the West Midlands, was launched after information was handed to their employer in April 2013.

Mr Robinson, in sentencing, set out in detail how the two men were caught out.

He said the officers had been briefed that a male suspect had been arrested by officers from neighbouring Warwickshire Police and they were then sent by their superiors to search that man’s home and seize evidence.

“What you did not know was that you were the subject of a covert monitoring integrity investigation set up to record and observe how you behaved,” said Mr Robinson.

The two did seize property for the mock investigation and returned to the police station, before filling out false reports of what they had collected.

Mr Robinson said: “You intended to mislead Warwickshire Police about what had been seized – you were later stopped and arrested.

“It was a joint offence you executed together.

“In my view it was calculated – that is apparent from the discussion recorded together (in the house); the property you decided to take, and the way you equally divided the property.

“You falsified not only the search records but the witness statement, and you did all this believing that or knowing that if circumstances were as you believed them, this could have impeded a critical investigation with all the consequences that might have had to the individual you believed to be in custody, and of course for justice itself.”

Mr Robinson added: “Both of you have suffered recent events in your life that have caused distress.”

He also accepted Davis and Samuels felt “genuine remorse” for what they themselves had described as a “terrible mistake”.

However, sentencing the pair – as relatives in the public gallery burst into tears – he said: “In my view, these offences are so serious that neither a fine, a community order, or a suspended sentence order can be justified.

“For the offence of theft you will each serve 20 weeks – half in prison, and half on licence.”

A legal restriction barring reporting of Davis’ address was lifted after an application by the Press Association.

Cop Jailed For Under-Age Sex

PC Christopher Semak Jailed
PC Christopher Semak Jailed

A police officer based in south Birmingham has been jailed for six years after being convicted of sexual activity with a child.

West Midlands Police said Christopher Semak carried out the crimes between April 2010 and November 2011 when the girl, who was known to the man, was aged 14 and 15.

The 33-year-old officer was arrested on January 24, 2012 from his Kings Norton home – on the same day the girl, then aged 16, revealed that she had been systematically assaulted over the course of two years, police said.

He was handed the prison sentence following a four-week trial at Stafford Crown Court.

A major police investigation was immediately launched and the officer, who joined the force in 2010, was suspended from the force with his access to police buildings restricted.

A police spokesman said that as part of the lengthy inquiry in which texts and emails were scrutinised, detectives did not find any other victims other than the girl who was known to Semak outside of work.

Detective Superintendent Tim Bacon, from the force’s Public Protection Unit, said: “Christopher Semak has today been found guilty of sexual activity with a child. It is clear that he groomed the victim for his own sexual gratification. His actions were disgraceful for any person let alone a man who, when he became a police officer, swore an oath to protect people.

“Throughout his trial Semak failed to take responsibility for his own actions.

“The verdict of the jury today reflects their belief that this was in fact a tissue of lies designed to undermine the victim and save himself.

“The sexual exploitation of children is child abuse. In this case the offender is a police officer who whilst not on duty at the time betrayed the trust that the victim and others had in him to take advantage of the victim and in doing so has caused her severe emotional trauma.

“I hope that he will reflect on his actions and the emotional scars he inflicted on his victim and those around him.”

Police said Semak was handed a sexual offences prevention order in addition to the jail sentence.

Semak is banned from working with or having unsupervised access to children under the conditions attached to the order.

He was also ordered to sign the sex offenders’ register for life.

With criminal proceedings now completed, the case will go before a special police disciplinary panel where senior officers will determine his future with the force in line with national guidelines.

Cop Gets 19 Years For Rapes

Wayne Scott headshot

An ex-policeman has been jailed for 19 years for a string of serious sex crimes.

Wayne Scott, 37, was convicted of rape and the attempted rape of a woman after a five-day trial, having already admitted raping a different woman seven times over a number of years.

He also confessed to two common assaults, one sexual assault and two counts of inciting a child to engage in sexual touching.

Sentencing Scott at Newcastle Crown Court, Judge James Goss QC described him as manipulative, controlling and domineering.

“Your offending has had an enormous impact on the wellbeing, confidence and lives of those against whom you offended, destroying their lives,” he said.

His offences came to light after he was dismissed by Cleveland Police when a member of the public complained about him touching her sexually while he was on duty.

Although he was not prosecuted for that offence, the publicity led other women to come forward and make complaints.

Speaking after the sentence, Detective Superintendent Peter McPhillips of Cleveland Police said: “I’m really pleased with the sentence today. Wayne Scott is a sexual deviant and a predator who manipulated his victims and had a significant detrimental impact on their lives.

“Yet he has never exhibited any remorse and he does not appear to understand the horrific nature of his crimes.

“I would like to pay tribute to all of his victims, in particular those who we managed to trace and who were brave enough to provide us with the details of his crimes.”

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Judge Goss said Scott would serve 15 years in custody and also passed a sexual offences prevention order and placed him on the sex offenders register.

A statement from one of his victims was read out saying she was worried about his release as he had already tried to contact her since being in prison.

On hearing his fate, Scott became unsteady on his feet, first bending over before sinking into his seat.

His appearances in the dock had been characterised by attempts to mouth words, sobbing and hanging his head.

Since his arrest, the 37-year-old, formerly of Stockton, Teesside, has twice tried to kill himself – jumping from a prison balcony and leaping from a moving vehicle while on his way to a medical examination.

Senior officers have said there are allegations from eight more victims that did not make it to court and they have again appealed for any other victims to come forward.

Mr McPhillips said: “I hope this sentence will send a positive message to victims of sexual abuse, that we will listen to them and together with our partners work with them to bring offenders to justice.

“I would again appeal to anyone who believes they were a victim of Wayne Scott to contact officers.”

Corrupt ‘Fit-Up’ Cop Jailed

Daniel-Withnell

A former police officer who accepted a bribe to plant a shotgun in a bid to frame a man has been jailed for four years, police said.

Daniel Withnell, 31, was approached by Claire Smethurst to put the weapon in the man’s car for £19,000 between September 30 and October 30 last year.

He admitted two counts of misconduct in a public office and perverting the course of justice at an earlier hearing and was today jailed at Manchester Crown Court.

Withnell, of Cranark Close in Bolton, also sent a fake tip-off by text to an officer on March 16, in which he claimed a hitman had been offered money to kill him.

He also used his position to access the force’s database to research a money laundering investigation, Greater Manchester Police (GMP) said.

Smethurst, 48, of Westhoughton, Bolton, was found guilty of of perverting the course and was given a 15 month suspended sentence for her role in the plot at the same court on October 9, the force added.

Assistant Chief Constable Dawn Copley said: “The conduct of former DC Daniel Withnell fell well short of what is expected of a police officer.

“Police officers, staff and the communities of Greater Manchester would be appalled by his actions, which detract from the hard work that our officers and staff do on a daily basis.

“GMP expects the very highest standards of all its officers and staff. They should be honest and act with integrity and should not compromise or abuse their position.

“As soon as this conduct came to light, the Professional Standards Branch carried out a thorough investigation, supervised by the IPCC and as a result Mr Withnell has been convicted of two counts of misconduct in public office and perverting the course of justice and Ms Smethurst has been convicted of perverting the course of justice.”

Mark Leech, editor of Converse the national newspaper for prisoners in England and Wales said Withnell faced a dangerous time in jail.

“Going to jail as a former cop is dangerous at any time, but going to jail as a former cop jailed for trying to fit up an innocent man and send him to jail marks Withnell out as a man with a price on his head.

“Withnell is the worst kind of corrupt cop, a loathsome individual who was willing to sacrifice the freedom of an innocent man in exchange for cash – a despicable low life whose past criminal arrests and convictions should now be the subject of review lest he has done this before – and got away with it.”