Inmate charged over razor attack on prison officer

A 25-year old prison inmate has been charged with grievous bodily harm after an officer had his throat cut.

Michael McKenna, of HMP Nottingham, is accused of attacking a 23-year-old member of staff at the jail on Sunday.

He has been charged with grievous bodily harm, attempting to inflict grievous bodily harm and a racially aggravated public order offence.

McKenna was due to appear at Nottingham Magistrates’ Court on Monday, Nottinghamshire Police said.

Prison Officers’ Association national chairman Mark Fairhurst said the officer, who was new to the job and still in his probationary period, needed 17 stitches after being attacked with a razor.

He has since been released from hospital.

An inspection report published last year found levels of violence at the prison were “very high”, with 103 assaults on staff in the previous six months.

Over the same period, there had been 198 incidents where prisoners had climbed on to safety netting between landings.

In the wake of the attack, prisons union the POA called for the roll-out of incapacitant spray to officers to be fast-tracked so that members have “equipment to deal with extreme violence”.

It said: “The Health and Safety of our members and indeed those in our care is paramount. Government ministers must now act swiftly before we are talking about a death of a serving prison officer.

“The violence in our jails as identified by this horrendous attack is at epidemic level and the union will not stand by and allow such attacks on our members.”

HMP Nottingham is a category B male prison which expanded in 2010 to hold 1,060 prisoners.

Mark Leech, Editor of The Prisons Handbook for England and Wales – the definitive 1500-page annual reference book on prisons now in its 21st annual edition – said he found the issue around Pava spray ‘bizarre’.

Mr Leech said: “We allow all 18+ prisoners to have rechargeable e-cigarettes for Vaping; why don’t we just issue rechargeable electric razors?

“What I find really bizarre is that new entry Prison Officers under going their initial 12-week training are not at any point trained in the use of Pava spray.

“On their POELT course they are taught how to restrain prisoners, how to conduct cell extractions, and even how to blow a whistle properly – but deploying Pava spray does not form any part of their initial training before they are posted to their first establishment – I just ask the simple question ‘why’?”