Prisoners MP Calls Intercepted

A prisoner makes a phone call home from the communal phone on C wing at the Young Offenders Institution, Aylesbury, UK.

Justice Secretary Chris Grayling has issued an apology to the House of Commons after revealing that telephone calls between prisoners and their constituency Members of Parliament or MPs’ offices may have been recorded or listened to by prison staff.

Mr Grayling told MPs that an independent investigation would be carried out by the Chief Inspector of Prisons Nick Hardwick.

Speaking at the start of his ministerial statement, he said: “I want to inform the House that telephone calls between prisoners and their constituency Members of Parliament or MPs’ offices may have been recorded and in some cases listened to by prison staff.

“This issue stretches back to 2006 and primarily relates to the period prior to autumn 2012 when this Government made changes to tighten up the system.

This is a serious matter and I would like to start by apologising to the House on behalf of my department for any interception of communications between a prisoner and their constituency MP.”

Mr Grayling said the issue was first brought to his attention on November 5 and he had come to the House “at the earliest opportunity”.

He said: “The prison rules and policy are clear that communication between prisoners and honourable members themselves must be treated as confidential where the prisoner is a constituent of theirs.”

He said the National Offender Management Service had identified instances since 2006 when detailed audit records start where calls between prisoners and MPs’ constituency and parliamentary offices had been set to record.

He said: “In a small number of cases those calls have been recorded and listened to by prison staff. From the initial investigation, NOMS has identified 32 current members of this House whose calls or those for their offices appear to have been both recorded and listened to.

“For 18 of these MPs it appears the prison did not list the number as confidential and therefore the action was not taken to prevent recording.”

He added: “In a further 15 cases, members appear to have been identified correctly on the system as MPs, but due to a potential failure in the administrative process the required action was not taken by prison staff so the calls were recorded and appear to have been listened to, one member falls under both categories.”

Mr Grayling said there is no evidence that information from the phone calls was passed on to anyone else and he did not believe it was part of a concerted attempt to monitor calls.

The Justice Secretary stressed it was part of the routine checking process and mistakes may have been made.

He told the Commons: “I have as yet seen no evidence that information was passed on to anyone else, I don’t believe this was part of a concerted attempt to monitor, it was simply part of the routine checking of this process to make sure nothing untoward was going on.

“But clearly again, it’s something I’ll be asking Nick Hardwick to confirm.”

Mr Grayling said he believed all recordings have now been destroyed as they are only kept for a limited period.

Since improvements to the system in autumn 2012, only one MP clearly identified on prison lists has had their calls with prisoners recorded and listened to, he added.

But there have been a small number of cases where phone calls between prisoners and lawyers were “accidentally recorded”, Mr Grayling said.

He added: “Whilst these have been dealt with individually with the prisoner at the time, I want to be confident that the safeguards for all confidential calls are satisfactory.”

Mr Grayling said Mr Hardwick will first report at the end of the month to ensure that safeguards to stop phone calls being recorded or listened to are in place before publishing a full assessment of the facts in early 2015.

Shadow justice secretary Sadiq Khan said the revelations were “truly shocking” and welcomed the investigation to be led by Mr Hardwick.

The Labour frontbencher pointed out that some of the conversations may have taken place with prisoners who had not yet been convicted of a crime.

He told the Commons: “What you have outlined in your statement is a very serious breach of confidentiality involving MPs and their constituents.

“Many of us in this House will deal with constituents in prison, many of which I remind the House have not been found guilty of any crimes, on a regular basis as part of our duties as good constituency MPs, often our staff speak to prisoners on our behalf as they do with other case work.

“I am sure I am not alone in being shocked in hearing today’s news that some of these conversations have been listened into, that some of these conversations have been listened into and recorded.

“That’s why it is important, as the Justice Secretary said, we get to the bottom of this as quickly as possible, find out the extent to which it was taking place, and put in place a system that prevents a repeat in the future.”

Mr Khan said questions remained over whether privately-run prisons were involved, how many prisons were involved and how many former MPs had their phone calls listened to.

Mr Grayling said the most recent call recorded was the constituency office of his colleague Lib Dem minister of justice and civil liberties Simon Hughes (Bermondsey and Old Southwark) where a prisoner spoke to a member of the constituency office rather than Mr Hughes to inquire about the progress of some constituency correspondence.

He said: “In each case it is important to understand whether the prisoners were speaking to an MP directly, rather than their office, and whether that MP was their constituency MP. These are relevant questions if we are to get to the bottom of what has gone on.

“I must say that I have seen nothing to suggest that there has been an intentional strategy of the Prison Service listening into calls between prisoners and individual Members of Parliament.”

Referring to former Labour justice secretary Jack Straw, he added: “In the case of the right honourable member for Blackburn, who was one of my predecessors, his calls were being recorded and listened to at a time when he was the secretary of state, it does appear that this issue appears to have arisen by accident rather than by design.”

He went on: “That is not however to detract from the fact that confidential phone calls between members of this House themselves and their constituents in prison may have been recorded and monitored.

“It is unacceptable and I want to ensure that we have taken every reasonable step to protect the confidentiality of communications between prisoners and their consistency MPs.”

In backbench exchanges, Mr Straw apologised for the phone calls listened to while he was justice secretary but said all the calls involving his office were conducted by members of his staff.

He said this showed that the monitoring by prison staff was probably an inadvertent mistake.

Mr Straw said: “I was in office for three of those six years and I feel it appropriate for me to offer an apology for what happened on my watch.

“I am grateful to you for giving me prior information about the fact that five or six calls were made to my office whilst I was justice secretary.

“I think at all material times I had an alibi that I was not on the end of the calls because I was either in the House of Commons or in the justice ministry and it looks as though all of those calls were made to my staff, not to me, and that the prisoner did not identify themselves as a serving prisoner, which I think underlines the fact that this is almost certainly due to inadvertence.”

Meanwhile, Tory former prisons minister Crispin Blunt said that in reality the revelations were probably “not hugely important” if it could be confirmed that no action was taken as a result of the calls being monitored.

Mr Blunt said: “I think the key thing here is there appears to be no actions that then followed the number of cases of monitoring and that there was no strategy within the department to oversee MPs’ conversations.

“And therefore perhaps in reality this is not a hugely important issue if it can be confirmed that no action was taken as a result of those calls being monitored in the normal way and now of course they won’t be under the new system.”

Mr Grayling said the monitoring was most likely down to a “series of errors”.

He said: “I see no evidence that this was part of a particular attempt to gain individual pieces of information and to pass them on.

“In a very large and complicated system with a very large number of people, my first impression is that this was a result of a series of errors but that doesn’t make it acceptable and of course I will be asking Nick Hardwick to confirm that it was a result of a series of errors but also to make sure it doesn’t happen again.”

Mr Straw urged the Justice Secretary to take into account a 2008 report which found the controversial taping of conversations Mr Khan had with a terror suspect in prison did not breach any rules.

The conversations between Babar Ahmad, an inmate of Woodhill Prison, and Mr Khan were taped but an inquiry by former judge Sir Christopher Rose found it was “inadvertent”, Mr Straw said.

He asked Mr Grayling: “In 2008 following a disclosure in the Sunday Times that Mr Khan’s conversation in a prison between him and a prisoner was being recorded, I set up an inquiry under Sir Christopher Rose, former very senior Court of Appeal judge, who also found that it was inadvertence and not conspiracy that led to this.

“May I suggest that that report of Sir Christopher Rose is drawn to the attention of Nick Hardwick for any lessons that could be followed through?”

Mr Grayling said he would pass the report to Mr Hardwick.

Prison Reform Trust director Juliet Lyon said: “This is not a breach of protocol – it is a fundamental breach of democratic rights and justice.”

Mr Hughes said he was “angry” about the situation and insisted he would continue his work within government to uphold civil liberties.

He told BBC Radio 4’s PM programme: “I am angry. I am also absolutely clear that we need to take action to prevent it happening, which is what has been done as quickly as humanly possible by the department responsible.”

He added: “I’m very concerned that we continue to uphold civil liberties.”

Prisoners should have internet access says Chief Inspector

Nick Hardwick
Nick Hardwick

Prisoners need greater access to new technology to assist with their rehabilitation, as long as the risks are carefully managed, said Nick Hardwick, Chief Inspector of Prisons. Today he spoke at the Modernising Justice through Technology, Innovation and Efficiency conference in London.

Referring to the findings of a joint report by the Prison Reform Trust and Prisoners Education Trust, Through the Gateway: How Computers can Transform Rehabilitation, Mr Hardwick said that greater internet access could assist prisoners in looking for jobs and studying for qualifications as well as for making practical arrangements prior to their release. There are other potential benefits of using technology to modernise justice, including digital case management and improved efficiency in the day to day running of prisons, he added.

Nick Hardwick said:

“Like other risk management processes in a prison, prisoners’ access to new technologies and the internet needs to be based on risk assessment of the individual concerned and properly supervised.

“I don’t think we can go on with prisons in a pre-internet dark age: inefficient and wasteful and leaving prisoners woefully unprepared for the world they will face on release. I don’t believe you can modernise justice through new technology without addressing this. Yes, there are security issues to be addressed, but the technology allows every key stroke to be monitored and access can be risk assessed. We now need to get on with getting this part of prison policy to make its long overdue entrance into the 21st century.”

A copy of the speech can be found on the HM Inspectorate of Prisons website from 24 June 2014 at: http://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmiprisons

Converse – Latest Edition published

page01022014

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Some of what is in the latest edition – 32 pages, delivering up to 60,000 copies into over a 120 prisons every month – THAT is Converse!

OAKWOOD INCIDENT RESOLVED AMID COVER UP CLAIMS * ‘MURDERED’ PRISONER NAMED * SWAIN AND CO – FAIRNESS NOW THE MAJOR FACTOR IN ORAL DECISIONS * DISTASTEFUL – MINISTERS PLAN TO SIDE STEP HUMAN RIGHTS RULING * COP CHARGED WITH SEX OFFENCES * CARRINGTONS SOLICITORS CONTINUE TO EXPAND * COP STOLE VICTIMS DETAILS * JUDGE REMOVED FROM OFFICE * 1 PUMP COURT BARRISTERS WORKING FOR YOU * FORMER PRISONS MINISTER DIES WHILE OUT RUNNING * TORY PLANS ON HUMAN RIGHTS SHAKE UP REVEALED * POLICE PROBE OVER CAMERA THREAT * ABSCONDER RECAPTURED * SPEEDING JUDGE GIVEN ADVICE * COP CHARGED WITH ASSAULT * CALL TO REPEAL ARCHAIC LAW * HOSPITAL WORKER ASHAMED OF TWEETS * IRVINE HANDED JAIL TERM OVER BRAWL * JUDGE WARNED FOR MISCONDUCT * SENTENCES ARE AN INSULT TO VICTIMS * ‘PLEBGATE’ COP PLEADS GUILTY * KYLES LEGAL PRACTICE * CONSCRIPT READERS LETTERS * COP JAILED FOR UNDER-AGE SEX * TERRORISTS FACE TOUGHER SENTENCES * CONQUEST READERS LEGAL QUESTIONS * HESLING HENRIQUES – RHONDA HESLING WRITES * EXPERT SLAMS TERROR SENTENCING PLAN * REOFFENDING CRIMINALS ‘AVOID JAIL’ * SLASHING CONVICTION SATISFIES STAR * MARK DUGGAN INQUEST VERDICT – WAS HE REALLY ARMED? * LAWRENCES SOLICITORS – LEGAL AID CHANGES – ADJUDICATIONS * KILLER BRIDGER DROPS SENTENCE PLEA * THREE HELD AMID COCK FIGHTING PROBE * MP TO PROBE OFFENDING BY VETERANS * THE PRISONS HANDBOOK 2014 * FALLING CRIME RATE MAY SAVE 84m * APPEAL IN HUNT FOR STOLEN TURTLE * ASHES TARGETTED * CRUTCH CROOK * MAN GUILTY OF RAPE DAYS AFTER LEAVING JAIL * JURY SWORN IN JUDGE TRIAL * MACKESYS * DLT “GROPED WOMAN” ON TOP OF THE POPS * EX-DEATH ROW MAN BID TO CLEAR NAME * DUNCAN LEWIS AND CO * ONEILL MORGAN SOLICITORS * SHIPMAN MAY HAVE PASSED TESTS * MINIMUM 17 YEARS FOR FAMILY DEATHS * RARE WATERLILLY STOLEN * SPOTLIGHT ON FOREST BANK * CRIMINAL DEFENCE SOLICITORS * CONVICTS THINK THEY’RE MORE MORAL* and much more!

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On The Run Offenders Face Extra Time

Criminals who go on the run to avoid being sent back behind bars could face an extra two years in prison under new measures announced by Justice Secretary Chris Grayling.
The new measure is aimed at punishing criminals who have been released from prison but abscond to avoid being recalled for breaching their licence conditions.
Under current laws, once they are caught they can be sent back to prison to serve the remainder of their sentence, but there is no additional penalty for going on the run.
The introduction of a new offence of being unlawfully at large following recall to custody will mean they could face additional punishment when they are recaptured and hauled before the courts.
The Ministry of Justice said around 800 criminals a year could face prosecution under the new offence which will carry a maximum two-year sentence.
It is already a criminal offence to escape from jail, to not surrender to custody when on bail and to not return from release on temporary licence, and this change will close a loophole in the law when offenders remain unlawfully at large following recall to custody.
Mr Grayling said: “It is unacceptable that criminals who disregard the law and attempt to evade the authorities are able to do so with impunity.
“I am today sending a clear message to those people that if you try to avoid serving your sentence you will face the consequences when you are caught. I think the hard-working taxpayers of this country would expect nothing less than tough punishment for offenders who try and beat the system.
“From my first day in this job I have been clear that punishment must mean punishment. We’re on the side of people who work hard and want to get on and my message is simple – if you break the law, you will not get away with it.”

Grayling In Prison Privileges Crackdown

Chris Grayling

All convicted male prisoners are to be banned from watching violent and sexually explicit films as part of a crackdown on “perks” that comes into effect today.

Inmates will also be required to wear a uniform for their first two weeks behind bars, and will lose automatic access to daytime television and gym equipment.

The changes to the prison service’s incentives and earned privileges regime have been ordered by the justice secretary, Chris Grayling, and will apply across England and Wales.

The requirement to wear prison clothes and restrictions on access to private cash will be compulsory for all convicted prisoners for the first fortnight of their sentence as part of a new “entry level” to the system. Female prisoners will not have to wear a uniform. In most cases the uniform will involve a grey or maroon tracksuit with a light blue T-shirt. In some jails older uniforms with a striped top will be worn.

Grayling has said that under the new policy a lack of bad behaviour will not be enough to earn privileges. Instead inmates will have to work actively towards their rehabilitation and help other prisoners.

The justice secretary has been particularly exercised about access to television for prisoners. The 4,000 inmates in privately run jails will not be able to watch Sky Sports or other subscription channels that are not available to public sector prison inmates.

All prisoners are to be banned from watching daytime television when they should be doing purposeful activities.

Prison governors have been working to make staff and prisoners aware of the changes since April to ensure the scheme is implemented safely.

Earlier this week Vicky Pryce, who was jailed along with her ex-husband, the former cabinet minister Chris Huhne, warned that there could be rioting when the changes come into effect. “There’s very little else to do in prison but watch television. It’s one of the very few things that these people have,” she said. “And if they take those away from their cells, as the government is saying it will do now, there will be riots, serious riots. And that is not an overstatement.”

But Grayling defended the changes saying: “For too long the public has seen prisoners spending their days languishing in their cells watching TV, using illegal mobile phones to taunt their victims on Facebook or boasting about their supposedly easy life in prisons. This is not right and it cannot continue.”

Mark Leech editor of Converse, the national newspaper for Prisoners said the crack down was “playing a dangerous game of politics with prisons.”

Mr Leech said: “The reason why so many prisoners spent their days locked up in their cells is because Grayling has cut prison budgets to the bone, there is no money for workshops and, even if there was, there isn’t the money to employ the amount of staff needed to escort them there.

“Grayling is playing a dangerous game of politics with prisons, it’s all very well him sitting safe and secure in his Whitehall office – it is prison staff on the landings who have to translate these dangerous policies into practice.”

Prisoner Votes in Supreme Court Tomorrow

ballot-box

The Sunday Times report that the government’s most senior legal officer is to make an unprecedented appearance before Britain’s highest court to oppose a bid by a child rapist and a murderer to win the right to vote in elections.

In a case starting tomorrow, Dominic Grieve, the attorney-general, will argue in the Supreme Court that parliament, rather than Europe, should decide prisoners’ voting rights.

Grieve’s decision to fight the case in person — the first time an attorney-general has appeared in the Supreme Court since it was established in 2009 — is a clear sign of the government’s concern about the claim, the latest round of Britain’s fight with Europe over prisoners’ votes.

George McGeoch, who befriended a deaf man and then murdered him by slashing his throat, and Peter Chester, who raped and strangled his seven-year-old niece, are using European law to claim the right to vote.

Experts are concerned that, if the claim is successful, it could hamper attempts by the government to give parliament the opportunity to assert its power over prisoners’ votes.

Parliament is to vote on whether to defy a ruling by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg that a blanket ban on prisoner voting has to end. MPs will be given the option of maintaining the blanket ban or introducing some voting rights.

McGeoch’s lawyers, however, plan to invoke European Union laws, which are separate from the human rights convention overseen by the Strasbourg judges.

Chester is seeking the right to vote in parliamentary and European elections. McGeoch claims he should be allowed to vote in European and Scottish parliamentary elections.

The European laws, unlike the convention, can be directly enforced by British courts without being subject to parliament. If McGeoch is successful, it could undermine the parliamentary vote and provoke fresh demands for powers to be repatriated from the EU.

Dominic Raab, the Tory MP for Esher and Walton and a former Foreign and Commonwealth Office lawyer, said: “The fact that the attorney-general is defending the case shows how serious an assault on our democracy it is.

“The EU’s backdoor attempt to dictate human rights to Britain is dangerous . . . and will strengthen calls for a wholesale renegotiation of British terms of [EU] membership. It is a battle we must win.”

McGeoch, 41, originally from Glasgow, was jailed for life in 1999 after he beat and smothered Eric Innes, a bakery worker, before slitting his throat. Since then he has held prison nurses hostage with a blade, slashed a fellow prisoner with broken glass and once escaped from custody.

Chester, from Blackpool, Lancashire, was handed a life sentence in 1978 for killing his niece at his sister’s home.

In 2009, he made an unsuccessful legal challenge to the ban on prisoner voting. In his ruling, the judge said the bid was “offensive to constitutional principles”.

However, European judges have refused to back down in the face of Britain’s defiance over votes for prisoners. Last week, Dean Spielmann, the president of the Strasbourg court, was highly critical of the British failure to implement its rulings.

“Such an attitude . . . undermines the whole system and it causes great damage to the credibility of the UK when it comes to promoting human rights in other parts of the world,” he told the BBC.

A government spokesman said: “The government has made its position on prisoner voting rights absolutely clear — we believe prisoner voting is a matter for national parliaments to decide.

“The attorney-general will strongly defend that position at the Supreme Court.”

Mark Leech editor of Converse the national newspaper for prisoners said the Supreme Court ‘should put the Goverment in its place”.

Mr Leech said: “In the same way that prison officers intervene to free a prison officeer taken hostage, so too should the Surpeme Court intervene and free the issue of prisoner voting which has been unlawfully taken hostage by successive governments.

“The UK is a signatory to the European Convention of Human Rights, and Judges of the ECHR have made clear the UK should either implement judgements of the ECHR or get out of the European Court altogether.

“The Supreme Court should put the Goverment in its place and tell it to implement the judgement on prisoner voting which politicians have disgracefully ignored now for eight years.”

Drug Gang Jailed For 167 Years

Oak3

Members of drugs gangs, who worked together to peddle over £1.5m of heroin and cocaine across Lancashire and other parts of the country, have been jailed for a total of 167 years one month.

36 people have now been sentenced as a result of Operation Oak, a covert Lancashire Constabulary Serious and Organised Crime Operation into the activities of criminal gangs operating in Blackburn and Preston, as well as other parts of Cumbria, Merseyside, Berkshire and West Yorkshire.

They were arrested in a series of early morning raids in August and September 2011 after a major police operation involving hundreds of police officers from across the northwest. During the various investigations which followed, over £1.5million worth of drugs were seized by police, along with over £200,000 in cash.

Gang leaders Suhail Vohra, 32, of Charnwood Close, Blackburn, Babar Qasam, 34, of Chestnut Walk, Blackburn; Asrer Khan, 29, of Dove Street, Preston; Neil Scarborough, 32, of Moor Hall St, Preston; Brett McWilliam, 22, of St Andrews Street, Barrow in Furness; Gary Rowlands, 28, of Sloop St, Barrow in Furness; Roman Moscicki, 30 of Adam Close, Slough; Rahman Miah, 29, of Azalea Court, Bradford and Jonathon Nicholls, 31, of Oak Grove, Tarbuck, Liverpool – along with their associates – were all sentenced for supplying class A drugs or money laundering offences.

Oak4

At a final sentencing hearing at Preston Crown Court on Monday 13 May, Tahier Chand, 34, of Manchester Road, Huddesfield was jailed for five years after pleading guilty to conspiracy to supply heroin. He is the 36th person to be sentenced in connection with Operation Oak.

Details of the full investigation can only now be made public due to reporting restrictions which were lifted following a hearing at Preston Crown Court last week.

Detective Superintendent Lee Halstead, of Lancashire Constabulary’s Serious and Organised Crime Unit, said: “Operation Oak has dismantled a network of drugs gangs responsible for the supply of over £1.5million worth of cocaine and heroin across northern England and has resulted in the recovery of huge sums of cash.

“As a result these people, who did not have a legitimate income, led comfortable and in some cases quite affluent lifestyles, acting as negative role models to young people. This was at the expense and misery of other residents in the community, whose lives were blighted by the effects of drug dealing and associated violence in their neighbourhoods.

Oak1

“This has been a large scale investigation and we have worked closely with officers from our neighbouring forces and the Crown Prosecution Service. Together, our actions have prevented a significantly large amount of drugs from reaching the streets of Lancashire helping to make the county a safer place.”

Billboard posters and leaflets will now be used to highlight the sentences to the communities who were affected by the gangs as part of Lancashire Constabulary’s Behind Bars campaign.

Det Supt Lee Halstead added: “Our planned ‘Behind Bars’ campaign should now remind everyone that 167 years in prison is proof that crime certainly does not pay.

“It’s incredibly important that people continue to support the police by providing us with information so that we can keep them safe and look for ways to prevent organised crime gangs from operating in the future.

Joanne Cunliffe, Crown Advocate from the CPS North West Complex Casework Unit added: “The fact that 36 individuals have been brought to justice for their involvement in the large scale supply of Class A drugs across the north of England is a testament to the close partnership between the CPS, Lancashire Police, Cumbria Police and other neighbouring forces.

“From the early stages of this investigation, the prosecution team provided guidance and advice to the police and tirelessly worked with them to build a strong case against each defendant.

“As a result we have successfully secured their convictions and dismantled a prominent source of drugs in our region and surrounding areas. The message is clear, we will not tolerate the supply of drugs on our streets and we are wholly committed to prosecuting those responsible.”

Anyone with information or concerns can contact police on 101 or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

CONVERSE: Latest 32-page Edition Just published

 

Converse: published 17th May 2013
Converse: published 17th May 2013 32-pages, 65,000 copies, 138 prisons every month!

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Some of what’s inside the May edition…..

SEX PEST COP JAILED

HUHNE & PRYCE FREED ON HDC

LEGAL HELP WITH ADJUDICATIONS – SWAIN & CO

TOP COP QUITS ON THE QT

DRUG-DEALING COP JAILED

MET COPS ACCUSED OF UNDERWORLD CONSPIRACY

STORY 4 CASH COP JAILED

COPS CLEARED OVER DEATH

1 PUMP COURT BARRISTERS ON LEGAL AID CUTS

SAVILLE: THE MISSED OPPORTUNITIES

MACKESYS 24HR CRIMINAL LAWYERS – ARE YOU DUE FOR RELEASE?

CASH POINT GANG NET £29m IN HOURS

SHRIEN DEWANI – FULL EXTRADITION NEARS

HMRC PRESS OFFICER TO BE CHARGED

SALFORD PRISON VAN ESCAPE

CORRUPT HMP WAKEFIELD OFFICERS LOSE THEIR APPEALS

COPS CRITICISED OVER DEATH PLUNGE

ALLEGED CORRUPT WPC IN COURT

THE BITTEN BUM THAT COULD BE A PAIN IN THE ARSE

CONSCRIPT – READERS LETTERS: BANNING PRISONERS FROM LEGAL AID

COPS SLAMMED FOR EXCESSIVE FORCE

CONQUEST – READERS LEGAL LETTERS ANSWERED BY WELLS BURCOMBE SOLICITORS

MURDER SENTENCE GUIDELINES ‘TOO RESTRICTIVE’

FACING THE MUSIC

HAZELL: MOTHER JUST WANTS ANSWERS

CUT THUMB COP GETS £5000

PRISON OFFICER ‘HEARD NO COMPLAINT’ FROM DEAD INMATE

POLICE IN NW £3.8m DRUGS BUST

LAWRENCES SOLICITORS – ONLY A FOOL REPRESENTS THEMSELVES

PRISON IN LOCK DOWN AFTER GANG VIOLENCE

PRISON OFFICER ARRESTED

THE PRISONS HANDBOOK 2013 – THE DEFINITIVE 1,200 PAGE ANNUAL GUIDE TO THE PRISON SYSTEM

POLICE FORCE PAYS OUT £550,000 IN COMPENSATION – JUST FOR STARTERS

INDIAN ACTOR SANJAY DUTTA SURRENDERS TO JAIL

RAPE ACCUSED DESERVE ANONYMITY

UNDULY LENIENT SENTENCES INCREASED

HESLING HENRIQUES WIN RECORD PAYOUT FOR INJURED PRISONER

MUSLIM PEER RESIGNS DAY BEFORE HEARING

DON’T ROT ON RECALL – FARADAYS SOLICITORS

HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE – £4.5m WINE FRAUD

KYLES LEGAL PRACTICE – FAMILY LAW FOR PRISONERS

ONEILL MORGAN SOLICITORS – PRISON PERSONAL INJURY SPECIALISTS

COP ANONYMITY PLEA REJECTED

SPOTLIGHT ON HMP THAMESIDE

1000+ COPS IN DAWN RAID